It doesn’t matter

For Kerry’s prompt at Real Toads. We are to write a micro poem in any form, 1 – 12 lines with the line “It doesn’t matter” from a poem by Rumi to be used in the poem. I have written a jisei – a Japanese death poem.  These were written before an anticipated death in battle or by suicide, of course they are sad; these people are getting ready to leave behind all they hold dear.  The Japanese have a saying:  Kyō wa shinu no ni yoi hidesu, just as the First People have.  They are untitled but today I am giving this a title. I have included a haiku at the end.  This is also being posted on Poets United Poetry Pantry.

It doesn’t matter
bitter winter winds –
in the garden the sleeping
cherry blossoms wait
for spring sun to awaken –
it doesn’t matter if I do not awaken

longest day ends –
it doesn’t matter says the moon –
rain begins to weep

30 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. qbit
    Jun 23, 2018 @ 15:17:58

    Strong end to that.

    Reply

  2. Frank J. Tassone
    Jun 23, 2018 @ 15:53:09

    Breathtaking, Toni!

    Reply

  3. Victoria C. Slotto
    Jun 23, 2018 @ 15:58:23

    How poignant. Reminds me pf the American Indian saying: “Today is a good day to die. “

    Reply

  4. Jim
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 00:17:57

    Oh Brrr, Toni. “it doesn’t matter if I do not awaken,” We are on the same wavelength. You got more personal than I.
    ..

    Reply

  5. sanaarizvi
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 03:43:06

    This is incredibly moving, Toni! 💜

    Reply

  6. Jinksy
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 06:43:32

    An interesting offering,though melancholy. ♥

    Reply

  7. Kerry
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 07:54:27

    You have captured a subtle sense of hopeless in these brief lines. How well the catch phrase works with the image of cherry blossoms.

    Reply

  8. coalblack
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 08:53:42

    I am liking these sloth-approved pieces. I can read without fear of fauxku! Sloths know a lot about short forms. Not everyone realizes that.

    I think you have demonstrated the jisei wonderfully. The sloth-apporoved haiku was actually my favorite part of the whole thing.

    Reply

  9. annell4
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 08:56:29

    When you get right down to it, it probably doen’t matter…the wheel is always turning, the cherry blossoms whispering. Almost as soon as the bloom, they fall from the tree. And perhaps they are whispering, it doesn’t matter. (Don’t worry, we will come again next spring.)

    Reply

  10. Björn Rudberg (brudberg)
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 10:13:51

    Love the thought of this… some days are just meant for us to leave… somehow the cherry will still bloom.

    Reply

  11. Vivian Zems
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 12:34:28

    Beautiful imagery, Toni

    Reply

  12. Sherry Marr
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 13:12:02

    Ah, the rain beginning to weep touches my heart. Beautiful.

    Reply

  13. magicalmysticalteacher
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 14:51:17

    I can’t help but wonder if there’s a chance that the rain will stop weeping.

    Reply

  14. Donna@LivingFromHappiness
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 15:34:22

    What we learn from nature and the seasons…beautiful!

    Reply

  15. ZQ
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 17:15:25

    Well done/written.

    Reply

  16. mhmp77
    Jun 24, 2018 @ 20:43:51

    kaykuala

    When it comes to the weather, it may change suddenly without warning!

    Hank

    Reply

  17. Mary
    Jun 25, 2018 @ 12:10:01

    Toni, this is really very poignant and meaningful somber; and I like your explanation too.

    Reply

  18. ladynyo
    Jun 26, 2018 @ 12:31:57

    Beautiful, Toni. And so damn true. Life continues around us. Love this poem.

    Reply

  19. Rosemary Nissen-Wade
    Jun 27, 2018 @ 17:20:19

    Delicately beautiful, though sad.

    (I Googled in vain for the translation of Kyō wa shinu no ni yoi hidesu – only to find it, or an approximation at least, in the comments! Some cultures seem much more aware than ours of death being a part of life.)

    Reply

    • kanzensakura
      Jun 27, 2018 @ 18:22:49

      Basically it translates to it’s a good day to die. I know. The western culture seems to push death to the background the same way they do aging. The Japanese with their attitude towards nature accepts it as an everyday occurrence.

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      Reply

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