Haibun: Flowering Quince

A second haibun for Merrill’s prompt, March Madness.

copyright kanzensakura  flowering quince

Haibun:  Flowering Quince
My ancient flowering quince is blooming, always the first of my yard flowers to do so.  The weather is crazy – freezing one day, warm the next.  Rainy one day, icy the next, sunny and warm the next.  My quince blithely ignores all the weather.  It begins to bloom mid-February whatever the weather.  I love this bush as it feels like a member of the family.  It was transported by root cuttings from England when my family immigrated in the early 1700’s.  It cheers me no matter what.  No matter that my father, grandmother, and grandfather all died in the same month of March, the same year.  The pink flowers proclaim resurrection.
rosy pink flowers
sing eternal life – eternal joy –
my ancestors smile

 

8 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. erbiage
    Mar 04, 2019 @ 17:07:28

    Love is all over this!

    Reply

  2. merrildsmith
    Mar 04, 2019 @ 20:03:01

    I love this, Toni! How cool that this comes from centuries-old cuttings. So much history, love, memories.
    (I think you entered the basketball poem twice in Mr. Linky instead of this one.)

    Reply

  3. Suzanne
    Mar 04, 2019 @ 21:46:54

    How wonderful to have a tree that carries your ancestral lineage. The photo of the tree in the snow is lovely.
    This haibun is so poignant – I felt swept along in currents of emotions.

    Reply

    • kanzensakura
      Mar 04, 2019 @ 22:32:36

      Thank you Suzanne. It really is a treasure. My aunts carried pieces of it to TN to plant at their homes there. It is living in VA, TN, NC, SC, NJ , and FL.

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      Reply

      • Suzanne
        Mar 04, 2019 @ 23:05:07

        How wonderful – bits of the same tree springing up across the country and the ancestral connection still remembered all these centuries later. What a great sense of permanence that must give you in these tumultuous times when all is changing.

        Reply

  4. Colleen@ LOOSELEAFNOTES
    Mar 05, 2019 @ 15:49:34

    Yes, cheerful rosy red whether Christmas or spring. I’m going out to look at my daffodil bulb heads now!

    Reply

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