Haiku – 041718

Today Sarah is officially joining the dVerse crew.  She gives us several paintings by the artist Fay Collins which we are to use one as inspiration.  I chose this one.  This is called an ekphrastic poem.

 

snow melted today
leaving behind a dead blackbird
and broken blue eggs

painting by Fay Collins used by permission

Haibun: Chijitsu

The word “chijitsu” is one of those beautifully specific Japanese words that means “lingering day”.  Haibun have no titles.  They are factual accountings of an event or time in one’s life.  They are always finished with a haiku;  there is always a seasonal word in haiku otherwise, it isn’t.  For day 17 in Nannernanner and the Tuesday Platform at Real Toads.

The air as warm as bathwater – the last part of the day is filled with birdsong. A soft breeze blows and gently moves the new yellow-green leaves on the trees. Through the trees I watch the red ball of fire that is the setting sun slowly hanging on to the day. Except for the birds it is silent. No sounds of traffic or neighbors mowing lawns, no sounds of children playing – simple silence. I love this part of the day almost as much as I love the night. The brash sun mutes itself to soft grey. The smell of lilac fills my being and I breathe deeply. Soon it will be night but I enjoy this lingering day until the skies become cobalt and filled with stars.
lingering day –
the day prepares for sleep –
birds tell goodnight tales

 

Onnabugeisha

For Paul’s Prompt at dVerse – soul searching

Onnabugeisha
Katsumoto: The perfect blossom is a rare thing. You could spend your life looking for one, and it would not be a wasted life.  The Last Samurai

Trees blooming in the spring –
cherry, pear, plum –
their blossoms last for a day and then die.
Petals drift and fall to the ground –
pink and white snow of petals.
My lover called me “*onnabugeisha”
And so I am.
I fought my way through grief
through rape, through death
and even through ovarian cancer.
I swung my katana
and cut through them all.
And the timeless prayers
to an Ancient Hebrew God
I know healed me.
I learned that I did not need to fight.
All I needed was to bloom –
To soak up the rain and sun
and gaze at the blue sky.
I should have died I know.
But my petals hung on.
I continue to gaze at the sky
and to allow my soul to bloom.

*Japanese for female samurai or warrior*

 

see blog for copyright information of poems and photos

Haibun: Who and why

Today I am hosting at dVerse Poets writing about why I write poetry and who inspired me.

Who and Why
I wrote my first haiku when I was six. Our next door neighbor, the last of his line, was a professor of Asian Studies at Duke University. I came and went freely in his home, looking at the antiques, the momentos from his journeys to Japan, and sipping lemonade on his generous front porch. Jamie Pollard was prissy, opinionated, and not afraid to speak his mind. Although I was six and he was 40, we became fast friends. His factotum was a Japanese man who kept the house in order, the vehicles running, and his employer looking perfect. He was also Jamie’s live in lover. At a time when such things were “not spoken of”, Jamie lived his life large. Often in the summer, as I lay on my stomach coloring in my coloring book, he would read Basho and Issa to me and we both sipped lemonade. I suspect his had some liquor added.

When I was 11 and totally bored, my grandmother stopped her preparation of dinner and went to the house library. She came back with several books – T.S. Eliot, Emily Dickinson, and H.D. Thoreau. She put them down in front of me and said, I think these will keep you busy for a couple of weeks. I was inspired by all three writers. Thus began my interest in writing about nature in the form of “snapshots”…haiku. The Viet Nam war was ramping up. I wrote of poems about peace, love, and later, about drugs. Once when I was practicing my cursive writing, my father took out a lovely fountain pen and gave it to me. He said to me, “write your heart”. And I did. I took it with me everywhere I traveled – from the Coast of North Carolina to the summit of Mt. Fuji. I loaded it up with peacock blue ink. I write my heart, my soul, my feelings, my questions about life. I write simply. Like spring rain or snow or the ancient trees in the forest. Inspired by poets and people I love, I write. I will always write about life and how I perceive it.

spring comes in slowly
scattering snow and cherry blossoms –
legacy of love in verse

Haibun: Snow like fire

Today is Quadrille Monday at dVerse. A quadrille is a poem in any form with exactly 44 words (excluding the title) and using the prompted word. Dee (Whimzy Gizmo) is the pubtender at dVerse Poets Pub. She has given us the world “fire” to use in the quadrille. I am actually doing non-traditional in the ending haiku with not keeping to the 5-7-5 syllable count.  I am publishing on dVerse Poets Pub

Snow like Fire
It started out as rain but quickly turned into heavy snow. Daffodils show like flames against the white. My flowering quince smolders like a slow fire in the falling snow.

snow falls like freezing fire–
flowers show against white –
burns slowly in the cold

copyright kanzensakura

 

 

Haikai Challenge #24 #1

Frank’s Challenge #24:  Snow

snow flowers blossom
out of season – unmindful
of pitiless storm

Haiku 03/07/2018

spring wind comes blowing
tossing sparrows to the sky –
wind bells clang loudly

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