Haiku: Rice Planting

For my prompt at Real Toads, writing poems to spring kigo.  Please keep the poems brief and with minimal description in the manner of Basho.  It is still cold here but not as bitter as a few weeks ago. Daffodils are pushing up their spears and my front yard is blue with tiny blue violets.

Haiku: Rice Planting

gentle cold spring rain –
cherry trees will soon lose their blooms –
rice is planted

Planting Rice by Hiroshige (1797 – 1858)

Haibun: In Your Eyes

For the Midweek Motif at Poets United – Love.

In Your Eyes
“In your eyes
The resolution of all the fruitless searches” Peter Gabriel

My husband has beautiful blue eyes. I didn’t realize until we had dated for awhile that one of them pulled to the left – lazy eye syndrome. His mother pointed it out to me and remarked how nice I was to not pay it any mind. I told her that I had not noticed it until she brought it to my attention. She prated on about it for awhile until I told her, I look at his heart, not his one lazy eye. He looks at me like I am a goddess instead of the short plump woman I am. We were married in August two years later, on the hottest day of the year. Our first dance was a rhumba to In Your Eyes. It always seemed perfect – in your eyes, I am complete.
hot August day –
sweat running down my spine –
we danced and were complete

Haibun: Winter Ocean

For De’s prompt at Quadrille Monday. The prompted word is kiss.  A quadrille is a poem of exactly 44 words and uses a prompted word.

Haibun: Winter Ocean

Walking along the shore, snow begins. The sky is grey overhead and golden sand becomes white. Broken shells roll in the surf. I hold my face up to the sky to be kissed.
lazy snowflakes kiss
the shore – ocean kisses back –
winter romance blooms

 

 

 

Haibun: Today’s Menu

For Susan’t prompt at Poets United Wednesday Motif: Zero Tolerance. Not one of my usual spare haibun.

Haibun: Today’s Menu
“Kindness is free.” Anthony Bourdain

Today’s Menu: Steamed cabbage, cole slaw, cabbage rolls made with deer meat, mashed potatoes, apples and oranges for dessert, white loaf bread. Tomorrow the meal will be tuna casserole with lots of noodles, cole slaw, restaurant donated desserts. All these items have been made with donated food – rotten pieces cut off from vegetables, meat donated by local hunters, dried milk to add protein in the potatoes. I cut and cook and serve along with the other volunteers. At 11:00 people begin lining up for their daily meal. They shuffle through the line – some of them with their eyes down, others bright and cheerful, some resigned, all of them grateful. No keto diets, no special needs meals, no no-carb meals, no I’m vegetarian or vegan. They are all hungry. They eat what they are given. They want some of everything. They eat it all and when everyone has gone through the line and all the places at the tables are filled and all are fed, they come back for whatever leftovers are offered. We smile at everyone. We plate the food carefully rather than slopping it on a plate. We try to give respect. I volunteer three days at week at a local food bank cooking food, making up bags of donated staple food, serving it and washing dishes afterwards. I look them all in the eye. This is the face of America. These are the invisible hungry in our midst. I have zero tolerance for hunger.
spring-like winter day –
the hungry come every day –
a chill in the air

Haibun: My Tree

A haibun for the theme of solitude at dVerse. This is in the style of the original haibun created by Basho – not a lot of description and words. Just the experience.

My Tree
“Love the trees until their leaves fall off, then encourage them to try again next year.”
― Chad Sugg

Being alone in a tree is heaven to me. There is one in our woods I climb on a regular basis. I sit there enthroned in his branches watching the clouds, listening to the sounds of woods creatures around me. In any weather I love sitting alone. Sometimes I take my violin and play for the tree. I think he likes it.
birds fly and make nests –
a fox passes at the base –
seasons pass in my tree.

 

Tribute: Rachel Sutcliffe

Recently Rachel Sutcliff died.  She was a consummate artist of haiku.  She was a member of the British Haiku society and often featured on Frank Tassone’s site about Haijin and writing of haibun, tanka, haiku.  She suffered from an immune deficiency disorder and died a little every day.  Her voice will be missed.

Tribute:  Rachel Sutcliffe
bitter winter day –
the sun comes out briefly.
pond ice melts slowly.

 

Haibun: Canoeing in the Pine Barrens

For Mish’s prompt at dVerse. Today is Quadrille Monday. A quadrille is a poem of exactly 44 words using the word prompted for the day. The word today is “steep” or variants of the word. I have taken you all to my beloved Pine Barrens in New Jersey. The creek and river water is colored with the tannins leached from the roots of the pine and cedar trees.  I have done a haibun in the manner of the original created by Basho – brief and to the point ended with a seasonal haiku.

Haibun: Canoeing in the Pine Barrens
Canoeing through the Pine Barrens is peaceful – floating on crystal clear water the color of tea leaves steeped in a glass pitcher. Silence. Slight shush of the canoe on water soothes us.
sounds of birds and wind –
umber colored water flows
through the Barrens

creek in the Pine Barrens

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