Haibun: Light overcomes darkness

For Frank’s Haikai Challenge number 63 – Habukah or Advent. Both start on the same day. I am lighting my first candle for Chanukah tonight. I will also be driving past the Hassidic Chabad temple to see the first candle lit there as well as subsequent lights – a public lighting proclaiming love and miracles for the world. This haibun is in the abbreviated style of the original created by Basho. This haibun has 76 words, less than 100.

Light Overcomes Darkness
The shamash or the attendant candle lights the other eight candles during Chanuka. The time of the festival of lights shows us the miracle of the oil lasting in the temple for eight days. Every night I will drive past the Hassidic Chabad to see one more candle lit, blazing for the world to see. In spite of hatred, shootings, gassings, genocide, the lights shine forth.
eight candles blazing
in the winter’s cold night –
light overcomes hate

The Ugly Hat

For Kerry’s Camera Flash at Real Toads. We are presented with a photo of Jessie Tarbox Beals, on of the first women photojournalists.

The Ugly Hat
Yes I know my hat looks like a cat
all covered with white fuzz.
But I love taking photos of cats.
Mainly long haired beauties of the rich.
I took over 80 photos of cats.
I don’t care for them but they are good subjects.
As long as they behave.
I get well paid for taking photos of cats.
I also get paid well for taking photos
Of shops and tea rooms in Greenwich village.
I am not much of a photojournalist
and the photos of the shops
all have these cutesy little poems at the bottom –
You can find laces and a whole more
At Tom’s Odds and Ends Variety Store!
Not much of a photojournalist
But I am prolific!
Eighty photos of cats –
just like my ugly hat.

Jessie Tarbox Beals
Early woman photojournalist 1904

Haibun: Things die but things live

For my prompt over at Real Toads – mono no aware. Mono no aware is the Japanese concept of a wistful sadness at the passing of things. It is also based on mujo – the Japanese word for change. Haibun is written in the classic style, less than 100 words. My haibun today has 52 words.

Haibun: Things die but things live
“Maybe that’s enlightenment enough: to know that there is no final resting place of the mind, no moment of smug clarity.” Anthony Bourdain

The rain is relentlessly falling, drenching everything. A hawk sits in the oak tree across the way looking hungry and cold. Suddenly it lifts its wings dives. I hear a faint scream. A small creature has met its end.

seasons change – things die –
but another creature lives –
rain keeps falling down

Haibun: The Last Holdout

For Imelda (guest prompting at dVerse) prompt of waiting at dVerse Haibun Monday. A haibun is a short prosimetric Japanese form. I am following my new style of writing haibun in the abbreviated style of the original haibun created by Basho, 44 – 100 words. Remember: A haibun is an accounting of a true incident that happened to you. It is not poetry separated by “haiku”. the haiku must be seasonal and nature related to be a haiku.  A haibun is also not flash fiction. This will also be posted on Tuesday Platform at Real Toads

Haibun: The Last Holdout
Almost the end of November. The weather varies between warm and cold, dry and wet. Some leaves still cling to the trees waiting for the word from Nature to let go and fall, drifting slowly to the earth. Every day I walk by and count fewer leaves than the day before.
the black oak
still warming the cold sky –
last to lose its leaves

copyright kanzensakura

 U7

Rainy Woods

For Kim’s prompt on Real Toads, seizing the day, getting it down.  She gives us three poems. This is the one that inspired me:
And the days are not full enough
And the days are not full enough
And the nights are not full enough
And life slips by like a field mouse
Not shaking the grass. by Ezra Pound

Rainy Woods
“Let the rain kiss you. Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops.” Langston Hughes

Stepping into rain
the walk leads past autumn woods –
the only sound is the rain tapping on the fallen leaves.
Off to the left a fox runs, tail down.
I stand and watch the rain dripping from the leaves
then I continue on my walk,
breathing in the scents of rain and rotting leaves.

Haibun – full beaver moon

For Frank’s Haiki Challenge #62, Winter Moon. I am keeping my new haibun short, more in keeping with the original haibun created by Basho. I am now writing haibun that are less than 65 words.

Haibun – Full Beaver Moon
The Algonquin tribes named this moon Beaver moon for the beaver traps set so beavers could be captured and many warm skins could be obtained. Early colonists also called this the full frost moon.  November cold sets in – frost sparkles on the grass
full frost moon rises
Thankgsgiving night- beavers sleep
in their lodges

full Beaver moon 11/24/18

 

Cherry Blossom Snow – sakura no yuki

For Anmol’s prompt over at dVerse – relationships and sensuality.  This is an “extreme” haibun being less that 65 words.  Actually, all haibun need to be short as in the original.  Haibun are true accountings ended with a seasonal haiku. Also posted on Real Toads Tuesday Platform.

Cherry Blossom Snow
“The heart was made to be broken.” Oscar Wilde

He was the most beautiful man I had ever seen, like an ancient Samurai. I fell in love at first sight. I was plain and short yet somehow, he fell in love with me. Long years of intense love and then, he returned to Japan. My heart broke.
cherry blossoms
fell like snow in the spring
caressing my skin goodbye

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