Haibun: Peace of Mind

Lynda Lyberg is the host at dVerse Poets Pub today. She writes about how do we purify our minds? A haibun for the prompt.

Haibun: Peace of Mind
“The places of quiet are going away, the churches, the woods, the libraries. And it is only in silence we can hear the voice inside of us which gives us true peace.” ― James Rozoff

Green, fresh, and fragrant as the pines, cedars, and oaks of the forest I wander among them. I learn a lot from these trees, in this forest. Creatures and insects go about their lives without being polluted by man and his bullshit. The creek burbles at the foot of the hill and minnows swim, nipping at the water spiders that skate on the surface. I own this land and have resisted offers to sell it. No price is high enough to destroy this place of peace. When I die, the land is willed to a peace foundation. I keep my mind pure by not allowing the poison into my veins, my mind, my heart, my home. When I die, the land will not be polluted by my ashes; instead they will just be dumped into the garbage can along with the rest of the refuse. I have not done much in my life but this one thing I have done – I have kept a place for my mind to wander away from the filth of humans.
peaceful forest –
peaceful mind –
peace lives here

copyright kanzensakura

Haibun: Hiroshima Day

This is a post I wrote a couple of years ago. It still rings true today. I have shortened it a bit and added a video by World Order, a Japanese singing group. I am posting the version with English lyrics so you call can understand the words. Ironically it ends at the beach on which the Fukushima Power Plant stands. The band received special dispensation to go and briefly film some shots there. It shows alternative power sources, the helping of the injured in the tsunami (symbolic) and how in their homage to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, “time just stops”.

Hiroshima Day
“We are still living in the aftershock of Hiroshima, people are still the scars of history.” – Edward Bond

America dropped the first of two atomic bombs on Hiroshima. People were going about their normal activities that day. Women were shopping for food to prepare for dinner that night. Children were playing and men were going about their business preparing to continue facing off against the Americans. They went about with living not knowing death was in the skies.

Suddenly the sky turned white and within a few seconds Hiroshima was almost obliterated from the face of the earth. The death toll was approximately 90,000 – 120,000 men, women, and children. Some walked after the blast until they collapsed and died. Others died of burns and being crushed by falling buildings. Skeletons could be seen in the debris. Still later, people died from bone marrow disease from the extreme radiation. A few skeletal structures remained standing, notably the white gate Shinto. “Photos” of people etched into stone by the blast- their bodies obliterated but replaced by the radiation remained. We bear a guilt so deep time will never leach it from our bones as the bomb turned people and buildings, plants, and animals into dust.

children jumping rope
on hot August day – becoming
shadows forever

Hunt

For Carrie’s Sunday Muse BlogSpot.

Sunday Muse BlogSpot  #67


Hunt

“Who sees the human face correctly: the photographer, the mirror, or the painter?” – Pablo Picasso

picking up pieces of myself
like Easter Eggs –
each one different,
each one with different paint.
oh my goodness this is tiring.
I think I’ll just sit a spell
and take a nap.

Survivor

For the Prose Pantry at Poets United.  Magaly has chosen the word “stitches” for us to use.

Survivor
“You can be a victim of cancer, or a survivor of cancer. It’s a mindset.” – Dave Pelzer

I should have died from the diagnosis but I did not. Most women do die from ovarian cancer. It mimics other symptoms of other diseases until it is too late. I had a canny doctor who ordered me for a biopsy and a CT scan. It was confirmed – I had ovarian cancer.

The treatments began until finally, surgery was the order for the day. The doctors gutted me like a fish and pulled out all the nasty bits, the parts infected with cancer. My surgeon was also canny and did not do stitches or staples. He used a special biodegradable and biocompatible superglue to seal the surgery closed. No stitches, no staples – I healed cleanly.

I was established in the guest room during my recovery from surgery.  My mother half sarcastically gave me an embroidery kit to work on while on bedrest. I looked at her like she was crazy. “You know my sewing kit consists of duct tape, staples, and safety pins.” She snorted and walked away. My two cats, Pugsley and SamCat the Ripper sniffed at the sewing kit and went down to the foot of the bed to guard me and keep me company. My husband looked at the kit and asked, “Is she serious?”

The embroidery kit was never opened. It was tossed to the side and discovered behind the bed a year later during a massive cleanup. I was determined – no stitches in me and no stitches in a kit.

 


embroidery kit for beginners

Emperor of the Dawn

For Real Toads, Kerry’s Art Flash/55  An American Sentence.

Emperor of the Dawn
Quincy Washington
used by permission

 

 

Emperor of the Dawn
“Loneliness will sit over our roofs with brooding wings.” ― Bram Stoker, Dracula

Bat winged dawn awakens me –  among the nightmares lonely flowers bloom.

Cedars on the Hill

For Sherry’s prompt at Real Toads, the art of Emily Carr, an artist from British Columbia, Canada.  A very interesting artist.

Cedars on the Hill
Cedars are terribly sensitive to change of time and light – sometimes they are bluish cold-green, then they turn yellow warm-green – sometimes their boughs flop heavy and sometimes float, then they are fairy as ferns and then they droop, heavy as heartaches. – Emily Carr

I watch the cedars on the hill across the way
like I watch the changing of the seasons.
the deep blue green,
the paler green,
the red of the dying branches.
I walk among them
and brush my hands against them
taking their scent unto myself.
small creatures live beneath them
and birds build their nests in them.
I love them most when it snows
and creatures hunker for warmth
in them and beneath them.
beneath the heavy sky
they stand in groups
and are their own community.


Cedar – Emily Carr 1942

 

 

 

 

Haiku – 7/31/2019

For my prompt, summer rain, at Wednesday Muse

Haiku – 7/31/2019
“And it’s a hard, …And it’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall” Bob Dylan

hot close summer day –
thunder rumbles – lightning flashes –
hard rain suddenly pours

 

 

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