New Moon

I have done a Bussokusekika, a Japanese poetic form that follows the rules of tanka, except there are three seven syllable lines that end the poem for a 5-7-5-7-7-7. Bussokusekika is an ancient form of poetry, older than Tanka or haiku. It translates to footprints of Buddha.

New Moon
crescent thin against
the black night – overpowered
by the stars she sings
a faint song of undappled
water and hunting owls – she
is lonely in the darkness

Haiku and Bussokusekika: New year’s Eve

We all know haiku – 5-7-5 (roughly) with seasonal word. The Bussokusekika is even more ancient Japanese form. It was supposedly found etched upon a stone at a ruined Buddhist temple. The name means “footprints of Buddha” and has a 5-7-5-7-7-7 (strict) syllable count. the weather is bitter – the temp for the days to come this week is to be in the mid-20’s. In spite of the cold, I wish you all warmth and joy in the New Year. This is written in response to Frank Tassone’s Haikai Challenge: #Haikai Challenge #14 (12/30/17): New Year #haiku #senryu #haibun #tanka #renga #haiga

bitter New Year’s Eve –
stray cats come out of hiding
to eat their fill

the futility
of burning incense – prayers
unanswered ignored
seem to be my fate in this
time of freezing days –
the smoke cannot reach you and
sadness remains – ashes fall
dry tears upon the table

dVerse Poets Pub – Old and New

Today Victoria is our pubtender and prompt giver. She asks us to take an old poem and rework it and to include both the old and the new poems.  I have taken one written in 1996 and reworked it.  It is now a Bussokusekika – older than tanka which is older than haiku – a couple of thousand years older and more deeply steeped in tradition.  The bussokusekika was discovered on an old stone in front of an ancient Buddhist temple and means – Footprint of Buddha.  It is like the tanka but has an extra seven syllable line added.  The form for this and tanka is strict – 5-7-5-7-7+7.  It is an obscure form and rarely used. For more information on tanka, please go to:  https://dversepoets.com/2015/11/30/japanese-poetic-forms-part-ii-more-twins/  The link to dVerse:  Let’s Kick It Up a NotchLet’s Kick It Up a Notch

New Poem
Age of Incense
The futility
Of burning incense – prayers
Unanswered ignored
Seem to be my fate in this
Time of rainy days –
The smoke cannot reach you and
Sadness remains – ashes fall
Dry tears upon the table….

 

free stock photo

free stock photo

Old Poem
Incense Days
you are gone
my ritual is this:
the burning of incense –
holy and fragrant.
the smoke travels in the wind
and I wish for it to reach you
to reach your mind to reach your heart
to say to you
come back. come back. come back.
the rain beats the smoke back down to earth
and only the wet grass hears.
I weep and light another stick.
more rain.
more sadness.
come back.

 

 

Light Through Leaves – komorebi

For Poets United Midweek theme – tranquility. Komorebi is the Japanese word for one of their specific aesthetics – it means: light filtering through tree leaves – the quality of the light as opposed through direct sunlight, light through clouds, etc. The word is used to denote that particular quality of light and the emotions of tranquility, serenity. Come visit at Poets United to read more poems based on the lovely prompt of tranquility – http://poetryblogroll.blogspot.com/2015/11/poets-united-midweek-motif-tranquility.html  The Japanese poetic form is Bussokusekika  Footprint of Buddha

komorebi 木漏れ日
in this cathedral
of trees preparing for sleep –
last dreams of summer –
light filters through the leaves –
gentle golden lullaby
spring will soon return – now sleep.

copyright kanzensakura

copyright kanzensakura

MTB – Humor

Today, Victoria has given us the wonderful prompt of writing something humorous.  To be honest, I’ve not been in a humorous frame for a couple of months.  I hope one of these fit the bill.   http://dversepoets.com/2015/10/22/seriously-thats-funny-dverse-meeting-the-bar/

free public domain image

free public domain image

I.  (senryu)
sparrows skate on ice
gobbling seeds – cat sneaks, spies, stalks –
leaps, slips – birds snicker.

II. (Bussokusekika poetic form)
high up in my tree
playing the violin and
watching fall at play –
leaves swirl birds chirp creek gurgles –
I saw notes trying my best
squirrel yells at me – silence!

 

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