Song of Us

Song of Us
“One way or another, we all have to find what best fosters the flowering of our humanity in this contemporary life, and dedicate ourselves to that.” – Joseph Campbell

Under a magnificent autumn sky
lives people,
people that
feed the hungry,
adopt and save animals,
visit and care for the elderly,
read to children in libraries,
help their neighbors with their lawncare
when their neighbors are suffering from cancer,
people who volunteer at animal shelters,
stand up for a child that is being bullied,
try to save the environment,
take a meal to a neighbor in need,
keep bees,
give their seat on a bus to a pregnant woman,
take a bullet for their law enforcement co-worker,
take a teen under their wing and love them,
babysit for a young couple so they can have a night out,
plant gardens to beautify and to feed,
feed the cats in the alley,
comfort a dying dog,
play with puppies at the shelter,
teach children how to read,
teach adults how to read,
bake something for the church or school bake sale,
call the police when there has been an accident,
try to do the right thing by all people,
share love and happiness with all…
this is the song of us.

copyright Toni Spencer

dVerse Poetics: Wishful Thinking

Today Mish is in charge of the prompt for Poetics today.  She wants us to make wishes – on a star, blowing on the fluff of a dandelion, our wishes for humanity, the world,  ourselves.  It is a lovely poetics.  I hope I do it justice. Come join us for wishes! http://dversepoets.com/2016/09/06/poetics-wishful-thinking/

Twitching one’s nose
It would be nice if I could twitch my nose
like Samantha, the witch from that old sitcom Bewitched.
I’d twitch my nose and twinkletwinkle,
people would be fed,
children would always be loved and welcomed,
the air would be clear and clean,
animals would no longer be hunted to the point of extinction
and all animals and humans would be treated humanely and with kindness.
we’d all have enough money for our daily needs and some of our wants.
politicians would disappear.
we’d all be tree climbers and water worshipers
flower growers and sharers of vegetables
from our gardens.
If I could be Samantha for just one day –
what a different world we would have.
twinkletwinkle! twitch! twitch!
make it so.

# 1 on the List

 

A co-worker has a list posted outside of her cubicle.  It is full of sayings, you know the kind.  But #1 is “Life isn’t fair, but it is still good.”   Well, actually, sometimes it isn’t but hopefully, it will be.  A few weeks ago, I read a post on another blog that broke my heart.  I am a sucker for the helpless and if the helpless is a child or an animal, my heart bleeds forever.

 There was a posting about a street dog who although sick and suffering, was tortured by “humans” because the dying dog bothered them.  Hello?  Bothered them???  My rage turned to pain and then grief and I am still grieving for that dog.  I will grieve until I lose my memory.  I have been thinking since then, that what causes us pain, what causes us to pray to God for mercy for those who only He remembers, is what makes us truly human.  See blog at:  http://globalinfo4all.wordpress.com/   (good stuff here but sometimes, it will break your heart – but always inspiring.  Check it out)

 Let me go back 15 years.  I was working for a state agency and my job was to approve and authorize hospice care.  I mainly dealt with persons who were HIV+.  I also volunteered for a local AIDS network who helped those who were disabled by the disease or dying by getting their groceries, caring for their pets, emptying their garbage, changing their diapers….holding their hands and loving them because many of them had been disowned by their families and their….dying bothered them. 

 I was contacted, off the record, by a policeman who was acquainted with me.  He told me they had hauled in a homeless, 13 year old HIV+ girl.  Her mother had died several months earlier of AIDS.  The girl’s grandmother grudgingly took them in but the girl took care of her mom – food, clothing, sick care, everything.  She had contracted HIV by being raped by her mother’s HIV+ boyfriend.  The grandmother was ashamed of them and turned her back because their illness and dying bothered her.  When the mother died, the grandmother turned the girl out on the street.

 The policeman had noticed the girl off and on and how her condition was deteriorating.  He contacted me to see if I could help.  I went to the juvenile facilities to see the girl – thin, dirty, tired, frightened, covered with sores and obviously picked at/abused by passersby who were bothered by her dying.  I arranged for her to be taken to a children’s hospice.  I then stayed with her until they came to get her.  I washed her face and hands, combed her hair, hugged her.  She melted into my arms and then she asked,  “am I going to die?”.  I pulled her closer and said, “Yes, you are going to die.  But you will be taken care of.  You will be clean and treated kindly and loved.  And when you die, you will be mourned and you will be missed.”  Three weeks late, she died at the hospice. 

 So, life was not good for the dog or the girl.  In some ways, though, it did get better although they went through hell to get to something better.  The dog died and was given a decent burial by a group that cared for the sick, smelly, scabby animal and tried to do the right thing for it.  Anna died but she was loved. 

 To this day, I mourn and grieve for her.  She has been added to that special place in my heart for those whom everyone except God has forgotten.  She lives there with the dog and other animals and people who shouldn’t have been treated as they were – some of whom died alone.

 So what makes us human?  What adds greatness to our humanity?  That room in our heart for those mourned by maybe, only us.

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