Haibun: Cedars against snow

For Real Toads Tuesday platform.  This haibun only has 39 words, more than enough.I feed a family of ten feral cats on a daily basis. Slowly I am getting them all fixed with rabies shots.

Haibun: Cedars against snow
Against the snow on the hillside, the cedars show up almost black. The wind whistles over the snow; the occasional bark of crows wafts over the meadow.
a crow caws
across the meadow – feral cats
line up for food

feral cats

Haibun: Bitter Kisses

For Sherry’s prompt over at Real Toads, Homecoming.  We are to write about the nostalgia of lost faces, lost loves, gone places.  She offers up one of my favorite songs by the Beatles. I am using it for my haibun here.  As the new usual I am writing in the old abbreviated form of the original haibun by Basho.  this one is rather long – 98 words.

Bitter Kisses
When I was a child I pulled green blades of a daffodil still wet with rain. I wanted to see how it tasted. I placed the green blade between my lips – slowly pulling using my tongue to feel the sharp edge of the bitter green blade.  Years later after kendo, my lover and I stood in the rain and kissed. He had daffodil lips. I drank in their cool wetness and my tongue probed the sharp edges of his teeth and the slightly bitter taste of his lips.

hot kisses –
bitter daffodils –
love withered away

Haibun: The Blizzard of Hate

A habun for De’s Quadrille today at dVerse Poets Pub. A quadrille is a poem in any form of exactly 44 words using the prompted word. Today the word is “cheer”. It must be used in any form of cheer within the Quadrille. With the re-emergence of Anti-Semitism it is hard to be cheerful during this season of the Festival of Lights, Chanukah. As a Jew, I feel this deeply. This will also be posted at Real Toads Tuesday Platform.  My haibun has exactly 44 words in the fashion of the first haibun created by Basho.

 

Public lighting of the Menorah

The Blizzard of Hate
The first candle of Hanukah is lit. Light shines in the darkness. Joy and laughter for the next few days. Anti-Semitism spreads like evil snow – a blizzard of hatred blankets the innocent.
genocide shootings –
cheer in the face of miracles
seems so far away

Berlin – anti-Semitism Rally, modern day

Haibun: Light overcomes darkness

For Frank’s Haikai Challenge number 63 – Habukah or Advent. Both start on the same day. I am lighting my first candle for Chanukah tonight. I will also be driving past the Hassidic Chabad temple to see the first candle lit there as well as subsequent lights – a public lighting proclaiming love and miracles for the world. This haibun is in the abbreviated style of the original created by Basho. This haibun has 76 words, less than 100.

Light Overcomes Darkness
The shamash or the attendant candle lights the other eight candles during Chanuka. The time of the festival of lights shows us the miracle of the oil lasting in the temple for eight days. Every night I will drive past the Hassidic Chabad to see one more candle lit, blazing for the world to see. In spite of hatred, shootings, gassings, genocide, the lights shine forth.
eight candles blazing
in the winter’s cold night –
light overcomes hate

Haibun: Things die but things live

For my prompt over at Real Toads – mono no aware. Mono no aware is the Japanese concept of a wistful sadness at the passing of things. It is also based on mujo – the Japanese word for change. Haibun is written in the classic style, less than 100 words. My haibun today has 52 words.

Haibun: Things die but things live
“Maybe that’s enlightenment enough: to know that there is no final resting place of the mind, no moment of smug clarity.” Anthony Bourdain

The rain is relentlessly falling, drenching everything. A hawk sits in the oak tree across the way looking hungry and cold. Suddenly it lifts its wings dives. I hear a faint scream. A small creature has met its end.

seasons change – things die –
but another creature lives –
rain keeps falling down

Haibun: The Last Holdout

For Imelda (guest prompting at dVerse) prompt of waiting at dVerse Haibun Monday. A haibun is a short prosimetric Japanese form. I am following my new style of writing haibun in the abbreviated style of the original haibun created by Basho, 44 – 100 words. Remember: A haibun is an accounting of a true incident that happened to you. It is not poetry separated by “haiku”. the haiku must be seasonal and nature related to be a haiku.  A haibun is also not flash fiction. This will also be posted on Tuesday Platform at Real Toads

Haibun: The Last Holdout
Almost the end of November. The weather varies between warm and cold, dry and wet. Some leaves still cling to the trees waiting for the word from Nature to let go and fall, drifting slowly to the earth. Every day I walk by and count fewer leaves than the day before.
the black oak
still warming the cold sky –
last to lose its leaves

copyright kanzensakura

 U7

Haibun – full beaver moon

For Frank’s Haiki Challenge #62, Winter Moon. I am keeping my new haibun short, more in keeping with the original haibun created by Basho. I am now writing haibun that are less than 65 words.

Haibun – Full Beaver Moon
The Algonquin tribes named this moon Beaver moon for the beaver traps set so beavers could be captured and many warm skins could be obtained. Early colonists also called this the full frost moon.  November cold sets in – frost sparkles on the grass
full frost moon rises
Thankgsgiving night- beavers sleep
in their lodges

full Beaver moon 11/24/18

 

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